985考试网 > 英语六级 > 考试试题 > 频道地图 > 正文

2021年6月英语六级考试真题及答案

2021-06-27 20:53:00
985考试网
手机版
字体:

2021年6月英语六级考试真题及答案

四六级试卷采用多题多卷形式,大家核对答案时,请找具体选项内容,忽略套数。

注:对题目和选项内容,不要纠结套数、ABCD顺序的问题

网络综合版:

听力

 Conversation One

Man: (1) It's my last day at work tomorrow. I'll start my new job in 2 weeks. My human resources manager wants to conduct an interview with me before I leave.

Woman: Ah, an exit interview. Are you looking forward to it?

Man: I'm not sure how I feel about it. I resigned because I've been unhappy at that company for a long time, but I'm not sure if I should tell them how I really feel.

Woman: To my way of thinking, there are two main potential benefits that come from unleashing and agitated stream of truth during an exit interview. The first is release. Unburdening yourself of frustration, and perhaps even anger to someone who isn't a friend or close colleague can be wonderfully free.

Man: Let me guess. The second is that the criticism will, theoretically, help the organization I'm leaving to improve, making sure employees of the future are less likely to encounter what I did?

Woman: That's right. But the problem with the company improvement part is that very often it doesn't happen. An exit interview is supposed to be private, but often isn't. In my company, the information gained from these interviews is often not confidential. (2) The information is used as dirt against another manager, or can be traded among senior managers.

Man: Now you've got me rethinking what I'll disclose in the interview. (3) There is always a chance that it could affect my reputation and my ability to network in the industry. It is a pretty small industry after all.

Woman: Anything you initially gained from the instant satisfaction of telling it like it is, you might lose down the track by injuring your future career prospects.

Man: Right. (4) Perhaps I would be better getting things off my chest by going to one of those rate-your-employer websites.

Woman: You could. And don't do the interview at all. Exit interviews are not mandatory.

Q1: What do we learn about the man from the conversation?

A) He will tell the management how he really feels.

B)He will meet his new manager in two weeks.

C) He is going to attend a job interview.

D) He is going to leave his present job.

Q2: What does the woman think of the information gained from an exit interview?

A) It should be kept private.

B) It should be carefully analyzed.

C) It can be quite useful to senior managers.

D)It can improve interviewees' job prospects.

Q3: Why does the man want to rethink what he will say in the coming exit interview?

A)It may leave a negative impression on the interviewer.

B)It may adversely affect his future career prospects.

C)It may displease his immediate superiors.

D) It may do harm to his fellow employees.

Q4: What does the man think he had better do?

A)Prepare a comprehensive exit report.

B)Do some practice for the exit interview.

C)Network with his close friends to find a better employer.

D)Pour out his frustrations on a rate-your-employer website.

Conversation Two

Man: Today, I’m talking to the renowned botanist, Jane Foster.

Woman: Thank you for inviting me to join you on the show, Henry.

Man: Recently, Jane, you’ve become quite a celebrity, (5) since the release of your latest documentary. Can you tell us a little about it?

Woman: Well, it follows my expedition to study the vegetation indigenous to the rain forest in equatorial areas of southeast Asia.

Man: You certainly get to travel to some very exotic locations.

Woman: It was far from glamorous, to be honest. The area we visited was accessible only by canoe and the living conditions in the hut were primitive to say the least. (6) There was no electricity.  Our water supply was a nearby stream.

Man: How were the weather conditions while you were there?

Woman: The weather was not conducive to our work at all, since the humidity was almost unbearable. At midday, we stayed in the hut and did nothing. (6) It was too humid to either work or sleep.

Man: How long did your team spend in the jungle?

Woman: Originally, we planned to be there for a month. But in the end, we stayed for only 2 weeks.

Man: Why did you cut the expedition short?

Woman: Halfway through the trip, (7) we received news that a hurricane was approaching. We had to evacuate on very short notice.

Man: That sounds like a fascinating anecdote.

Woman: It was frightening. The fastest evacuation route was through river Rapids. We had to navigate them carrying all of our equipment.

Man: (8) So overall was the journey unsuccessful?

Woman: (8) Absolutely not. We gathered a massive amount of data about the local plant life.

Man: Why do you put up with such adverse conditions?

Woman: Botany is an obsession for me. Many of the destinations I visit have a stunning scenery. I get to meet a variety of people from all over the world.

Man: So where will your next destination be?

Woman: I haven't decided yet.

Man: Then we can leave it for another vacation. Thanks.

Questions 5 to 8 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

Q5: What does the man want Jane Foster to talk about?

A) Her unsuccessful journey

B)Her month-long expedition

C)Her latest documentary

D)Her career as a botanist

Q6: Why does the woman describe her experience as far from glamorous?

A)She had to live like a vegetarian

B)She was caught in a hurricane.

C) She had to endure many hardships

D) She suffered from water shortage

Q7: Why did the woman and those who went with her end their trip halfway?

A)A hurricane was coming

B)A flood was approaching

C)They had no more food in the canoe.

D) They could no longer bear the humidity

Q8: What does the woman think of the journey?

A) It was memorable

B)It was unbearable

C) It was uneventful

D) It was fruitful

Passage One

Scientists often use specialized jargon terms while communicating with laymen. (9) Most of them don't realize the harmful effects of this practice. In a new study, people exposed to jargon when reading about subjects like autonomous vehicles and surgical robots. Later said they were less interesting in science than others who read about the same topics, but without the use of specialized terms. They also felt less informed about science and less qualified to discuss science topics. It's noteworthy that it made no difference if the jargon terms were defined in the text. Even when the terms were defined, readers still felt the same lack of engagement as readers who read jargon that wasn't explained.

The problem is that the mere presence of jargon sends a discouraging message to readers. Hillary Schulman, the author of the study, asserts that specialized words are a signal. Jargon tells people that the message isn't for them. There's an even darker side to how people react to jargon. (10) In another study, researchers found that reading scientific articles containing jargon led people to doubt the actual science. They found the opposite, when a text is easier to read. Then. People are more persuaded. Thus, it's important to communicate clearly when talking about complex science subjects. This is especially true with issues related to public health, like the safety of new medications and the benefits of vaccines. (11)Schulman concedes that the use of jargon is appropriate with scientific audiences. But scientists who want to communicate with the general public need to modify their language. They need to eliminate jargon.

Questions nine to eleven are based on the passage you have just heard.

Q 9: What does the passage say about the use of jargon terms by experts?

A) It diminishes laymen's interest in science

B) It ensures the accuracy of their arguments

C) It makes their expressions more explicit.

D) It hurts laymen's dignity and self-esteem.

Q10: What do researchers find about people reading scientific articles containing jargon terms?

A) They can learn to communicate with scientists

B)They tend to disbelieve the actual science

C)They feel great respect towards scientists

D)They will see the complexity of science

Q11: What does Schulman suggest scientists do when communicating with the general public?

A) Find appropriate topics

B)Stimulate their interest

C) Explain all the jargon terms

D)Do away with jargon terms

Passage Two

At the beginning of the twentieth century, on the Gulf coast in the US state of Texas, there was a hill where gas leakage was so noticeable that schoolboys would sometimes set the hill on fire.

(12) Patio Higgins, a disreputable local businessman, became convinced that there was oil below the gassy hill. Oil wells weren't drilled back then. They were essentially dug. (13) The sand under the hill defeated several attempts by Higgins’ workers to make a proper hole. Higgins had forecast oil at 1000 feet, a totally made-up figure. Higgins subsequently hired a mining engineer, captain Anthony Lucas. (14) After encountering several setbacks, captain Lucas decided to use a drill, and his innovations created the modern oil drilling industry. In January 1901, at 1020 feet, almost precisely the depth predicted by Higgins Wild Gas, the well-roared and suddenly ejected mud and six tons of drilling pipe out of the ground, terrifying those present. For the next nine days until the well was capped, the well poured out more oil than all the wells in America combined.

In those days, Texas was almost entirely rural, with no large cities and practically no industry. Cotton and beef were the foundation of the economy. (15) Higgins’ well changed that. The boom made some prospectors millionaires, but the sudden surplus of petroleum was not entirely a blessing for Taxes. In the 1930s, prices crashed to the point that in some parts of the country, oil was cheaper than water. That would become a familiar pattern of the boom or bust Texas economy.

Q12: What did Texas businessmen Patio Higgins believe?

A) The local gassy hill might start a huge fire

B) There was oil leakage along the Gulf Coast

C) The erupting gas might endanger local children

D) There were oil deposits below a local gassy hill

Q13: What prevented Higgins’ workers from digging a proper hole to get the oil?

A) The massive gas underground

B)Their lack of the needed skill

C)The sand under the hill

D)Their lack of suitable tools

Q14: What does the passage say about Captain Lucas' drilling method?  

A) It rendered many oil workers jobless

B)It was not as effective as he claimed

C) It gave birth to the oil drilling industry

D)It was not popularized until years later

Q15: What do we learn about Texas's oil industry boom?  

A)It radically transformed the state's economy

B) It resulted in an oil surplus all over the world

C) It totally destroyed the state's rural landscape

D)It ruined the state's cotton and beef industries

Recording One

Most people dislike their jobs. It's an astonishing but statistical fact, [16] a primary cause of employed dissatisfaction, according to fresh research, is that many believe they have terrible managers. Few describe their managers as malicious or manipulative, though, while those types certainly exist, they are minority. The majority of managers seemingly just don't know any better. They're often emulating bad managers they've had in the past, is likely they've never read a management book or attended a management course. They might not have even reflected on what good management looks like and how it would influence their own management style. The researchers interviewed employees about their managers. Beginning with a question about the worst manager they had ever had. From this, the researchers came up with four main causes of why some managers are perceived as being simply awful at their jobs.

[17]The first cause was company culture, which was seen by employees as enabling poor management practices. It was specifically stressful work environments, minimal training, and a lack of accountability that were found to be the most blame worthy. Often a manager superiors can effectively encourage a manager's distasteful behavior when they fail to discipline the persons wrong doings. Such workplaces are sometimes described as toxic. The second cause was attributed to the managers characteristics: those deemed to be most destructive were odd people, those without drive, those allow personal problems into the workplace, and those with an unpleasant temperament or personality in general. The third cause of poor management was associated with their deficiency of qualifications. Not so much the form of variety one obtains from a university. But the informal variety that comes from credible work experience and professional accomplishments. The fourth course concerned managers who've been promoted for reasons other than potential. One reason in particular why these people had been promoted was that they had been around the longest. It wasn't their skill set, or other merits that got them the job, it was their tenure.

A point worth making is that the study [18] was based only on the perspective of an employee's. The researchers didn't ask senior leaders what they thought of their front-line managers. It's quite possible, their content with how the individuals they promoted are now performing. Merrily ignorant of the damage they're actually causing. Which might explain why, as the researchers conclude, those same middle managers are usually unaware that they are a bad manager.

Question 16: What is a primary cause of employee dissatisfaction according to recent research?

A)Unsuitable jobs

B)Bad managers

C) Insufficient motivation

D)Tough regulations

Question17: What is one of the causes for poor management practices?

A) Ineffective training

B)Toxic company culture

C) Lack of regular evaluation

D)Overburdening of managers

Question 18: What do we learn about the study on job dissatisfaction?

A) It collected feedback from both employers and employees

B)It was conducted from frontline managers' point of view

C)It provided meaningful clues to solving the problem

D)It was based only on the perspective of employees

Recording Two

With the use of driver-less vehicles seemingly inevitable, [19]mining companies in the vast Australian desert state of Western Australia are definitely taking the lead. Iron ore is a key ingredient in steel-making. The mining companies here produce almost 300 million tons of iron ore a year. The 240 giant autonomous trucks in use, in the Western Australian mines, can weigh 400 tons, fully loaded. And travel at speeds of up to sixty kilometers per hour. They are a technological leap, transporting iron ore along routes which run for hundreds of kilometers from mines to their destinations. Here when the truck arrives at its destination, staff in the operation center direct it precisely where to unload. Vast quantities of iron ore are then transported by autonomous trains to ocean ports. Advocates argue these automated vehicles will change mining forever. It may only be five years before the use of automation technology leads to a fully robotic mine. A range of factors has pushed Western Australia's desert region to the lead of this automation revolution. These include the huge size of the minds, the scale of equipment and the repetitive nature of some of the work. Then there's the area's remoteness, at 502,000 square kilometers. It can sometimes make recruiting staff a challenge. Another consideration is the risks when humans interact with large machinery. There are also the financial imperatives. The ongoing push by the mining corporations to be more productive and more efficient is another powerful driver in embracing automation technology. The concept of a fully autonomous mind is a bit of a misleading term, however. This is because the more technology is put into the field, the more people are needed to deploy, maintain and improve it. [20] The automation and digitization of the industry is creating a need for different jobs. These include data scientists and engineers in automation and artificial intelligence. The mining companies claim automation and robotics present opportunities to make mining more sustainable and safer. Employees will be offered a career that is even more fulfilling and more rewarding. [21] Workers' union have accepted the inevitability of the introduction of new technology. But they still have reservations about the rise of automation technology. Their main concern is the potential impact on remote communities. As automation spreads further, the question is how these remote communities will survive when the old jobs are eliminated? And this may well prove to be the most significant impact of robotic technology in many places around the world.

Questions 19 to 21 are based on the recording you have just heard.

Question 19: What does the passage say about the mining industry in Western Australia?

A) It is seeing an automation revolution

B) It is bringing prosperity to the region

C)It is yielding an unprecedented profit

D) It is expanding at an accelerating speed

Question 20: What is the impact of the digitization of the mining industry?

A) It exhausts resources sooner

B)It creates a lot of new Jobs

C)It causes conflicts between employers and employees

D) It calls for the retraining of unskilled mining workers

Question 21: What is the attitude of workers' union towards the introduction of new technology?

A) They welcome it with open arms

B)They will wait to see its effect

C)They are strongly opposed to it

D) They accept it with reservations

Recording 3

According to official statistics, (22) Thailand’s annual road death rate is almost double the global average. Thai people know that their roads are dangerous, but they don’t know this could easily be changed. Globally, road accidents kill more people every year than any infectious disease. Researchers at the institute for health metrics and evaluation in America put the death toll in 2017 at 1.24 million. According to the institute, (23) the overall number of deaths has been more or less static since the turn of the century. But that disguises a lot of changes in individual countries. In many poor countries, road accidents are killing more people than ever before. Those countries have swelling, young populations are fast-growing fleet of cars and motorbikes and a limited supply of surgeons. It is impossible to know for sure, because official statistics are so inadequate. But deaths are thought to have risen by 40% since 1990 in many low income countries. In many rich countries, by contrast, roads are becoming even safer. In Estonia and Ireland, for example, the number of deaths has fallen by about two thirds since the late 1990s. (24)But the most important and intriguing changes are taking place in middle income countries, which contain most of the world’s people. And have some of the most dangerous roads. According to researchers in China and South Africa, traffic deaths have been falling since 2000. and in India since 2012, and the Philippines reached its peak four years ago. The question is whether Thailand can soon follow suit. Rob Mckinney, head of the International Road Assessment Program, says that all countries tend to go through three phases. They begin with poor, slow roads. In the second phase, as they grow wealthier, they pave the roads, allowing traffic to move faster and pushing up the death rate. Lastly, in the third phase, countries act to make their roads safer. The trick, then, is to reach the third stage sooner by focusing earlier and more closely on fatal accidents. How to do that?(25)The solution lies not just in better infrastructure, but in better social incentives. Safe driving habits are practices which people know they should follow that often don’t. Dangerous driving is not a fixed cultural trait, as some imagine. People respond to incentives such as traffic laws that are actually enforced.

Questions 22 to 25 are based on the recording you have just heard.

Questions 22: What does the speaker say about traffic accidents in Thailand?

A) Their cost to the nation’s economy is incalculable.

B)They kill more people than any infectious disease.

C) Their annual death rate is about twice that of the global average.

D)They have experienced a gradual decline since the year of 2017.

Question 23: What do we learn from an American institutes statistics regarding road deaths?

A) They show a difference between rich and poor nations.

B) They don’t reflect the changes in individual countries.

C)They rise and fall from year to year.

D) They are not as reliable as claimed.

Question 24: What is said about middle income countries?

A)Many of them have increasing numbers of cars on the road.

B)Many of them are following the example set by Thailand.

C) Many of them have seen a decline in road-death rates.

D) Many of them are investing heavily in infrastructure.

Question 25: What else could be done to reduce fatal road accidents in addition to safer roads?

A) Foster better driving behavior.

B)Provide better training for drivers.

C)Abolish all outdated traffic rules.

D) Impose heavier penalties on speeding.

      第一套答案

  1.A) He is going to leave his present job.

  2.B, It should be kept private.

  3.C) It may adversely affect his future career prospects.

  4.A)Pour out his frustrations on a rate-your-employer websites.

  5.B) Her latest documentary.

  6.D) She had to endure many hardships.

  7.D) A hurricane was coming.

  8.C) It was fruitful

  9.B) It diminishes laymen's interest in science.

  10.C) They tend to disbelieve the actual science.

  11.B) Do away with jargon terms.

  12.A) There were oil deposits below a local gassyhiU.

  13.D) The sand under the hill

  14.C) It gave birth to the oil drilling industry.

  15.D) It radically transformed the state's economy.

  16.D) Bad managers.一

  17.B) Toxic company culture.

  18.A) It was based only on the perspective of employees.

  19.D) It is seeing an automation revolution

  20.A) It creates a lot of new job.

  21.C) They accept it with reservation.

  22.B). Their annual death rate is about twice that of the global average.

  23.C). They don' t reflect the changes in individual countries.

  24.B). Many of them have seen a decline in road-death rates.

25.A). Foster better driving behavior.

仔细阅读1-题源

Passage One

We often think of drawing as something that takes innate talent, but this kind of thinking stems from our misclassification of drawing as, primarily, an art form rather than a tool for learning.

Researchers, teachers, and artists are starting to see how drawing can positively impact a wide variety of skills and disciplines.

Drawing is not an innate gift; rather, it can be taught and developed. Doing so helps people to perceive the world more accurately, remember facts better, and understand their world from a new perspective.

Most of us have spent some time drawing before, at the very least because of compulsory art classes. It's also likely that you've scribbled curlicues in the margins of your notes during some particularly boring lecture about how the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell or how to graph linear equations.

But at some point, most of us stop drawing. There are people who don't, obviously, and thank god for that: a world without designers and artists would be a very shabby one indeed. But the vast majority of adults quit doodling when they quit having to take notes, and the closest they get to making something visually creative is applying a wacky font in a PowerPoint presentation.

But some argue that so many adults have abandoned drawing is because we've miscategorized it and given it a very narrow definition. In his book, Stick Figures: Drawing as a Human Practice, Professor D.B. Dowd argues that "We have misfiled the significance of drawing because we see it as a professional skill instead of a personal capacity. This essential confusion has stunted our understanding of drawing and kept it from being seen as a tool for learning above all else."

Dowd argues that we mistakenly think of "good" drawings as those which work as recreations of the real world, as realistic illusions. Rather, drawing should be recategorized as a symbolic tool. In an interview with Print Magazine, Dowd said:

“Drawing is an ancient human activity, practiced by all persons. How do I get to the airport? Pretend your phone is dead, so forget GPS. Anyone trying to answer that question is likely to say, "Here, let me show you…" and grab a pencil and an envelope to scribble on. That's drawing! We use it all the time. Explain the rules of hockey. Describe geology. Help me understand "The Mason-Dixon Line." These things have to be manifested visually.”

Human beings have been drawing for 73,000 years. It's an inextricable part of what it means to be human. We don't have the strength of chimpanzees because we've given up brute strength to manipulate subtle instruments, like hammers, spears, and — later — pens and pencils. The human hand is an extremely dense network of nerve endings; the somatosensory homunculus (a sculpture of a human being where the body proportions correspond to how sensitive the associated nerve networks are) demonstrates this well. In many ways, human beings are built to draw.

In fact, doodling has been shown to affect how the brain runs and processes information in a significant way. Some researchers argue that doodling activates the brain's so-called default circuit — essentially, the areas of the brain responsible for maintaining a baseline level of activity in the absence of other stimuli. Because of this, some believe that doodling during a boring lecture can help students pay attention.

Evidence has shown that doodling does actually improve memory. In one study, participants were asked to listen to a list of names while either doodling or sitting still. Those who doodled remembered 29 percent more of the names than those who did not.

It's not just absent-minded, abstract doodling that helps the brain either; drawing concepts and physical objects forces your brain to engage with a subject in new and different ways, enhancing your understanding. For example, some researchers tested study participants' ability to recall a list of words based on whether they had copied the word by hand or drawn the concept — like writing the word "apple" versus drawing one. The drawers often were able to recall twice as many words.

There's also evidence that drawing talent is based on how accurately someone perceives the world. The human visual system tends to misjudge size, shape, color, and angles but artists perceive these qualities more accurately than non-artists. Cultivating drawing talent can become an essential tool to improve people's observational skills in fields where the visual is important.

In biology, for example, describing and categorizing the shape and form of living things is critical. Prior to the invention of the photograph, biologists were trained draftsmen; they had to be in order to show the world the details of a new species. Now, some biology professors are reintroducing physical drawing in their biology courses. The reasoning is that actively deciding to draw helps people see the world better.

Rather than think of drawing as a talent that some creative people are gifted in, we should consider it as a tool for seeing and understanding the world better — one that just so happens to double as an art form. Both absent-minded doodling and copying from life have been shown to positively affect your memory and visual perception, so raise hell the next time your school board slashes the art department's budget.

  46.What do people generally think about drawing?

  A) It is a gift creative people are endowed with.

  B) It is a skill that is acquired with practice

  C) It is an art form that is appreciated by all.

  D) It is an ability everyone should cultivate.

  47.What do we learn about designers and artists?

  A) They are declining gradually in number

  B) They are keen on changing shabby surroundings.

  C) They add beauty and charm to the world.

  D) They spend most of their lives drawing.

  48.What does Professor D.B.Dowd argue in his book?

  A) Everybody is born with the capacity to draw.

  B) Drawing is a skill that requires special training

  C) The value of drawing tends to be overestimated

  D) Drawing should be redefined as a realistic illusion.

  49.What have some researchers found from one study about doodling?

  A) It is a must for maintaining a base level of brain activity.

  B) It can turn something boring into something interesting

  C) It is the most reliable stimulant to activate l the brain.

  D) It helps improve concentration and memory.

  50.What is characteristic of people withdrawing talent?

  A) Sensitivity to cognitive stimulation.

  B) Subtlety of representation.

  C) Accuracy in categorization.

  D) Precision in visual perception.

答案

We often think of drawing as something that takes inborn talent, but this kind of thinking

46. A) It is a gift creative people are endowed with.

47. C) They add beauty and charm to the world.

48.A)Everybody is born with the capacity to draw.

49.D)It helps improve concentration and memory.

50. D) Precision in visual perception

The car has reshaped our cities. It seems to offer autonomy for everyone·

51.B)They present a false picture of the autonomy cars provide.

52.C) Only some can be put to use under current traffic conditions.

53.A)It is likely to create traffic jams in other places.

54.B)It seldom delivers all the benefits as promised.

55. C) Technological innovation should be properly regulated.


仔细阅读2

Passage One

We often think of drawing as something that takes innate talent, but this kind of thinking stems from our misclassification of drawing as, primarily, an art form rather than a tool for learning.

Researchers, teachers, and artists are starting to see how drawing can positively impact a wide variety of skills and disciplines.

Drawing is not an innate gift; rather, it can be taught and developed. Doing so helps people to perceive the world more accurately, remember facts better, and understand their world from a new perspective.

Most of us have spent some time drawing before, at the very least because of compulsory art classes. It's also likely that you've scribbled curlicues in the margins of your notes during some particularly boring lecture about how the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell or how to graph linear equations.

But at some point, most of us stop drawing. There are people who don't, obviously, and thank god for that: a world without designers and artists would be a very shabby one indeed. But the vast majority of adults quit doodling when they quit having to take notes, and the closest they get to making something visually creative is applying a wacky font in a PowerPoint presentation.

But some argue that so many adults have abandoned drawing is because we've miscategorized it and given it a very narrow definition. In his book, Stick Figures: Drawing as a Human Practice, Professor D.B. Dowd argues that "We have misfiled the significance of drawing because we see it as a professional skill instead of a personal capacity. This essential confusion has stunted our understanding of drawing and kept it from being seen as a tool for learning above all else."

Dowd argues that we mistakenly think of "good" drawings as those which work as recreations of the real world, as realistic illusions. Rather, drawing should be recategorized as a symbolic tool. In an interview with Print Magazine, Dowd said:

“Drawing is an ancient human activity, practiced by all persons. How do I get to the airport? Pretend your phone is dead, so forget GPS. Anyone trying to answer that question is likely to say, "Here, let me show you…" and grab a pencil and an envelope to scribble on. That's drawing! We use it all the time. Explain the rules of hockey. Describe geology. Help me understand "The Mason-Dixon Line." These things have to be manifested visually.”

Human beings have been drawing for 73,000 years. It's an inextricable part of what it means to be human. We don't have the strength of chimpanzees because we've given up brute strength to manipulate subtle instruments, like hammers, spears, and — later — pens and pencils. The human hand is an extremely dense network of nerve endings; the somatosensory homunculus (a sculpture of a human being where the body proportions correspond to how sensitive the associated nerve networks are) demonstrates this well. In many ways, human beings are built to draw.

In fact, doodling has been shown to affect how the brain runs and processes information in a significant way. Some researchers argue that doodling activates the brain's so-called default circuit — essentially, the areas of the brain responsible for maintaining a baseline level of activity in the absence of other stimuli. Because of this, some believe that doodling during a boring lecture can help students pay attention.

Evidence has shown that doodling does actually improve memory. In one study, participants were asked to listen to a list of names while either doodling or sitting still. Those who doodled remembered 29 percent more of the names than those who did not.

It's not just absent-minded, abstract doodling that helps the brain either; drawing concepts and physical objects forces your brain to engage with a subject in new and different ways, enhancing your understanding. For example, some researchers tested study participants' ability to recall a list of words based on whether they had copied the word by hand or drawn the concept — like writing the word "apple" versus drawing one. The drawers often were able to recall twice as many words.

There's also evidence that drawing talent is based on how accurately someone perceives the world. The human visual system tends to misjudge size, shape, color, and angles but artists perceive these qualities more accurately than non-artists. Cultivating drawing talent can become an essential tool to improve people's observational skills in fields where the visual is important.

In biology, for example, describing and categorizing the shape and form of living things is critical. Prior to the invention of the photograph, biologists were trained draftsmen; they had to be in order to show the world the details of a new species. Now, some biology professors are reintroducing physical drawing in their biology courses. The reasoning is that actively deciding to draw helps people see the world better.

Rather than think of drawing as a talent that some creative people are gifted in, we should consider it as a tool for seeing and understanding the world better — one that just so happens to double as an art form. Both absent-minded doodling and copying from life have been shown to positively affect your memory and visual perception, so raise hell the next time your school board slashes the art department's budget.

答案

Humans are fascinated by the source of their failings and virtues. This preoccupation..…

46.D)Students' academic performance is determined by their genes.

47.A) Its result was questionable.

48.B) It is not one of cause and effect.

49.A) Take all relevant factors into account in interpreting their data.

50.D) Promoting discrimination in the name of science.

Nicola Sturgeon's speech last Tuesday setting out the Scottish government's legislative programme.….

51. B) Tourists will have to pay a tax to visit Scotland.

52.C)Its ruling party is opposed to taxes and regulation.

53.D) Ease its financial burden of providing local services

54.A) They don't seem to care about the social cost of tour- ism.

55.D) Unclear.

仔细阅读3

Passage One

ou can’t see it, smell it, hear it. People disagree on how, precisely, to define it, or where, exactly, it comes from. It isn’t a school subject or an academic discipline, but it can be learned. It is a quality that is required by artists. But it is also present in the lives of scientists and entrepreneurs. All of us benefit from it: we thrive mentally and spiritually when we are able to harness it. It is a delicate thing, easily stamped out; in fact, it flourishes most fully when people are playful and childlike. At the same time, it works best in tandem with deep knowledge and expertise.

This mysterious – but teachable – quality is creativity, the subject of a report published this week by Durham Commission on Creativity and Education, a body chaired by Sir Nicholas Serota, the chair of Arts Council England, with input from figures including film director Beeban Kidron, architect Sir David Adjaye and choreographer Akram Khan. The report, put together in collaboration with academics from Durham University, concludes that creativity is not something that should inhabit the school curriculum only as it relates to drama, music, art and other obviously creative subjects, but that creative thinking ought to run through all of school life, infusing the way human and natural sciences are learned.

The authors, who focus on education in England, offer a number of sensible recommendations, some of which are an attempt to alleviate the Gradgrindish turn in education policy of recent years. When children are regarded as pitchers to be filled with facts, creativity does not prosper; nor does it when teachers’ sole objective is, perforce, coaching children towards exams. One suggestion from the commission is a network of teacher-led “creativity collaboratives”, along the lines of existing maths hubs, with the aim of supporting teaching for creativity through the school curriculum.

Nevertheless, it is arts subjects through which creativity can most obviously be fostered. The value placed on them by the independent education sector is clear. One only has to look at the remarkable arts facilities at Britain’s top public schools to comprehend this. But in the state sector the EBacc’s focus on English, maths and science threatens to crush arts subjects; meantime, reduced school budgets mean dwindling extracurricular activities. There has been a 28.1% decline in uptake of creative subjects at GCSE since 2014, though happily, art and design have seen a recent uptick.

This disparity between state and private is a matter of social justice. It is simply wrong and unfair that most children have a fraction of the access to choirs, orchestras, art studios and drama that their most privileged peers enjoy. As lives are affected by any number of looming challenges – climate crisis, automation in the workplace – humans are going to need creative thinking more than ever. For all of our sakes, creativity in education, and for all, must become a priority.

答案

You can't see it, smell it, or hear it, and people disagree on how precisely to define it,or where exactly it comes from....

46.D)It contributes to intellectual growth but can easily be skilled.

47.B) Cultivation of creativity should permeate the entire school curriculum.

48.C) Test-oriented teaching.

49.B) They attach great importance to arts education.

50.C)Providing all children with equal access to arts education.

Emulating your conversation partner's actions is a common

"mirroring" and has been... human behavior classified as

51.C) Imitate their partners' gestures without their knowing it.

51. B)When both sides have a lot of things in common.

52. 53.A) It encourages people to imitate.

53. A)It facilities the creation of one's own writing style

55.D)It may do harm as well as good.

选词填空1

I’m always baffled when l walk into a pharmacy and see shelves bursting with various vitamins,extracts and other supplements, all promising to accelerate or promote weight loss Aisles of marketing genius bell(掩饰) the fact that,(26),weight loss is dictated by the laws of arithmetic.Economist Jessica lrvine wrote a book about how she used math to help her lose more than 1 kilograms.If calories taken in are less than calories(27),weight shall be lost,and so it is with money.

Despite the (28) of financial products, services and solutions geared towards accumulating wealth,it all begins with the same(29):getting ahead financial requires a reduction of spending so that income is greater than expenses.I was reminded of this again recently listening to an with Nicole Haddow, the author of Smashed-Av ocado,explaining how she cracked the property market at (31).It was quite a(30) given where she had been two years earlier She was sobbing at the Nicole didn't celebrate her30th birthday as she had (31) She was sobbing at the dinner table with her parents,with whom she had just move back in.She had no stable income,S12,000 in credit-card debt and no plan,but to her(32),her father,an accountant,told her that her financial (33) wasn't as bad as the thought.He said,on her income,with some changes,she would be able to buy an investment unit within two years,which sh did.

Nicole admitted she was fortunate,as she was able to live with her parents and

34) her spending-and life-to gather self on track financially.Creating a gap between  income and spending required a paradigm shift and (35)sacrifice and commitment but by going into financial lock down,Nicole gained financial independence.

【参考答案】

26 O) ultimately 27 F)expended 28 A)abundance 29 E)equation 30 G)feat

31 D)envisaged 32B)astonishment 33 L)plight 34 J)overhaul 35 C) entailed

选词填空2-题源

A new study has drawn a bleak picture of cultural inclusivity reflected in the children’s literature available in Australia.

Dr Helen Adam from Edith Cowan University’s School of Education investigated the cultural diversity of books housed in the kindergarten rooms of four long day care centres in Western Australia.

Only 18 per cent of 2413 books in the total collection contained any representation of non-white people.

“Many children from ethnic minority groups are more likely to see a dinosaur or rabbit as a main character in a book rather than a member of their own culture,” Dr Adam said.

“Minority cultures were often featured in stereotypical or tokenistic ways, such as portraying Asian culture with chopsticks and traditional dress.

“We also saw that characters that did represent a minority culture usually had secondary roles in the books, with the main characters being Caucasian.

“This is concerning as it can lead to an impression that whiteness is of greater value.”

Dr Adam said children form impressions about ‘difference’ and identity from a very young age.

“Very early in life, children develop an awareness and recognition of difference, and evidence has shown they develop own-race bias from as young as three months of age,” Dr Adam said.

“The books we share with young children can be a valuable opportunity to develop children’s understandings of themselves and others.

“Books can also allow children to see diversity and both similarities and difference between themselves and others.. This can help develop understanding, acceptance and appreciation of diversity.”

Census data has shown Australians come from more than 200 countries, speak over 300 languages at home, belong to more than 100 different religious groups and work in more than 1000 occupations.

“Despite Australia’s multicultural society, the current overwhelming promotion of white middle class ideas and lifestyles risks alienating children from minority groups and giving white middle class children a sense of superiority or privilege,” Dr Adam said.

点击下载完整版》》2021年6月英语六级考试真题及答案.doc

相关推荐